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Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health’s Culture as Treatment Symposium: Aboriginal Perspectives on Child and Youth Mental Health

2013-07-04

September 25 to 27, 2013 – Ottawa, ON

Wednesday, September 25 – Keynote Address – 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.($60 or free with registration for Thursday and/or Friday)

Thursday, September 26 – Mental Health & Addictions – 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Friday, September 27 – Best Practices – 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

$175 PER DAY OR $300 FOR BOTH DAYS

EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION CLOSES ON JULY 31st, 2013

LOCATION:

Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health, 299 Montreal Road, Ottawa, ON

SPEAKERS:

Chief Wilton Littlechild, Dr. Martin Brokenleg, Dr. Margo Greenwood, Maria Campbell, Mary Simon, Jan Longboat, Tom Porter, Dr. Cindy Blackstock, Dennis Windigo, Albert Dumont, Reepa Evic-Carleton and more.

A complete guide of all training sessions will be posted on the website (www.wabano.com) shortly.

PURPOSE:

Wabano’s “Culture as Treatment” series was created to provide ongoing training and development for service providers working with Aboriginal communities of all ages. Learn how culture is the most effective treatment, intervention, and protective factor for Aboriginal clients; and how culturally-safe practices and/or activities can be incorporated into your organization’s work. This unique training series builds capacity in your organization to offer culturally-competent care for Aboriginal people, while creating a broader circle of support within our communities.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND:

Mental health, addictions, and healthcare professionals, teachers, child protection workers, government agencies, Aboriginal agencies, police officers, judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, child and youth workers, university and college students and community members

NT5