Study: Associations between breastfeeding and select health outcomes for off-reserve First Nations, Métis, and Inuit children in Canada

March 20, 2017

Past research has shown that breastfeeding is related to positive health outcomes among infants and children, but less is known about the possible benefits of breastfeeding among specific groups of Aboriginal children.

Today, a new study fills this gap by examining the relationship between breastfeeding and the prevalence of asthma/chronic bronchitis and chronic ear infections among First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children and Inuit children.

The study, based on data from the Aboriginal Children’s Survey, finds that First Nations children living off reserve and who were breast-fed had a lower prevalence of asthma/chronic bronchitis and chronic ear infections.

This result held true even after controlling for other clinical, demographic and other factors that might have an impact on health outcomes. Nevertheless, the results should not be interpreted as causal relationships.

In the case of Métis or Inuit children, however, there was no significant relationship between breastfeeding and the prevalence of asthma/chronic bronchitis or chronic ear infections.

Products

The article “Association between breastfeeding and select chronic conditions among off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children in Canada” is now available in Insights on Canadian Society (Catalogue number75-006-X).

Contact information

For more information, contact us (toll-free 1-800-263-1136514-283-8300STATCAN.infostats-infostats.STATCAN@canada.ca).

To enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, contact Nadine Badets (613-790-0353nadine.badets2@canada.ca).

For more information on Insights on Canadian Society, contact Sébastien LaRochelle-Côté (613-951-0803sebastien.larochelle-cote@canada.ca).

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