2021 National Action Plan: Ending Violence Against Indigenous Women, Girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people 1-Year Anniversary

Press Release

The findings of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people were published June 3, 2019, in the Final Report: Reclaiming Power and Place: The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. The 2021 National Action Plan: Ending Violence Against Indigenous Women, Girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people (NAP) was a response to the National Inquiry and was released on the 2nd anniversary of the Reclaiming Power and Place report.

The National Inquiry included First Nations, Inuit, and Métis survivors, families, communities, knowledge carriers and elders, along with representation from each Canadian province and territory, the Federal Government, and experts gathered to discuss economic, social, institutional, systemic, historical causes, policy and practices that perpetuates violence against Indigenous Women, Girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. Colonial structures whether historic like the Indian Act, Sixties Scoop, residential schools or current like the ongoing violence in the child welfare, healthcare and justice systems; and the ongoing denial of Indigenous rights to safety, security and wellbeing leads directly to today’s heightened rate of violence, death, and suicide in Indigenous communities. The inquiry concluded that the violence perpetrated on Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people is genocidal.

The National Inquiry’s final report contained 231 Calls for Justice, legal imperatives that call upon federal, provincial, and Indigenous governments; organizations, institutions, and Canadians citizens to end the systemic and societal violence against Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. The Calls for Justice came from over 2,300 testimonies, including some from Métis women and girls. Métis witnesses who testified emphasized the need for greater awareness of Métis issues, distinct realities, and the need for practical supports for Métis families.

The National Family and Survivors Circle (NFSC), Contributing Partners1, and provinces/territories made up separate action plans which incorporated relevant Calls for Justice. The NAP interconnects these separate strategies to build an overarching, living document that identifies priority activities that will drive change across Canada to ensure that Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people can live free of violence.

“We envision a transformed Canada where Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, wherever they are,34 live free from violence, and are celebrated, honoured, respected, valued, treated equitably, safe, and secure.” – National Action Plan Vision Statement

Key sections to the National Action Plan include:

• The Vision and Guiding Principles for the National Action Plan

• The Goals of the National Action Plan

• The common short-term priorities for the National Action Plan

• Summaries of Action Plans/Strategies from the National Family and Survivors Circle, Contributing Partners, and provinces/territories

• Discussion of immediate next steps and ideas for monitoring progress

The federal, provincial, and Indigenous governments; organizations, institutions, and Canadians citizens have a responsibility to end the systemic and societal violence against Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people. The successfulness of the measures implemented will be determined by how effectively these changes are experienced by Indigenous women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people, families and survivors of violence.

“June 3rd marks the one year anniversary of the release of the National Action Plan and the 3rdyear anniversary since the release of the final report – Reclaiming Power and Place: The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. It is time to start seeing action… real action. Metis women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people continue to go missing, are murdered, and are living in situations that are unsafe. We can’t wait any longer for more reports to be completed just to sit on a shelf, the government needs to start putting the 231 Calls for Justice into action. Call for Justice 1.7, Which speaks to the establishment of a National Indigenous and Human Rights Ombudsperson and Tribunal requires urgency in its implementation.” – Jana Schulz, Region 4 Women’s Representative & Previous Metis member on the National Family and Survivor’s Circle

Visit the National Action Plan for more information about the guiding principles, goals and strategies, the National Inquiry’s Final Report, 231 Call for Justice, Thanks for Listening Report for information, and visit Ending Violence Association of BC for access to regional resources and services. Learn the Signal for Help.

If you or someone you know is in crisis:

VictimLinkBC Toll-Free Number 1-800-563-0808 (Call or text)

Trans Lifeline Toll-Free Number 1-877-330-6366
Métis Crisis line at 1-833-Metis-BC (1-833-638-4722)

1 The Contributing Partners includes the First Nations Sub-Working Group, the Inuit Working Group, the Métis Nation Sub-Working Group, the Sub-Working Group of the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples, the Urban Sub-Working Group, the 2SLGBTQQIA+ Sub-Working Group, the Data Sub-Working Group, and the Federal Sub-Working Group.

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